Tag Archives: autistic teen transitioning to adulthood

Transition Check-In: The Keys to Supported Independence

If I had written this post just one week ago, it would have been titled “Transition Check-In: The Waiting Game,” because that’s where we were, where we have been, where we thought we would be for at least year two years, waiting for Nigel’s HUD to go into effect. I thought we would have to wait for that to happen before we could set him up in his own apartment with support from Living Opportunities, a local nonprofit organization that helps adults with developmental disabilities to live their lives as independently as possible, while offering assistance in any form that is needed. They have already begun to provide services for Nigel while he is still living in my home, taking him to appointments, helping him to organize his living space and his time. They are very professional and specially trained to handle various needs, personalities, and preferences. They focus on presuming competence and facilitating independence. In fact, they even provide services for a few people who do not communicate with speech, but with supports in place are able to be in their own apartments. Without this support they would undoubtedly be placed in group homes, sharing a small room with another adult. It’s amazing and wonderful what Living Opportunities does. We are so blessed to have this organization in our area.

Last summer, when I moved Nigel back from the group home, I was advised to apply and get him on the waiting list for HUD, which I did. I didn’t realize that in doing so, he would also be on the waiting list for several apartment complexes in our area that offer certain units for low-income tenants who are waiting for their HUD approval. A couple of weeks ago, I received a letter in the mail that one of these units was available.

I called the Housing Authority office to let them know that we were interested, and they said that they had sent that letter out to about 20 people. With Nigel, I drove by the place anyway, just to see what the complex looked like. It was new, quiet, and definitely not Crackville. Nigel agreed that it looked like a nice place to live. Unfortunately I had a very busy week and was only able to call about the apartment the day before the end date for applications, so I figured the apartment would go to someone else, and we would wait for another one of these apartments to become available.

But a week later, the Housing Authority office called me. They said that Nigel was next in line. I asked if that meant there was one person ahead of him and they said, No, he’s it. He’s the next one eligible to apply if he still wants to. And the very next day we went down to that office and filled out the application with me as the co-signer.

Four days later, they called and said the apartment was his! We are going in next Monday to sign the lease and get the keys, the keys to Nigel’s autonomy that he needs and so rightly deserves. The keys to the space for his massive Lego collection, the privacy to act out (in costume) scenes from his favorite movies, and the satisfaction of not having his mother telling him when to shower or take his meds (the support providers will do that when they check in on him every day). (!!!!) And these same keys are also the keys to my relief, to being able to focus on Aidan’s last year of high school next year, and to regaining my sense of self that has been shelved for so long I don’t even know what that self was. These are the keys to rediscovering her.

It’s another big step, probably the biggest, in Nigel’s journey to and through adulthood, a journey to which I have devoted much time and energy. He will have all the support he needs through Living Opportunities, he will spend time with family members at least twice a week, and I am always a text or call away.

Moving Day is in three weeks, when the rubber really does meet the road. It’s the start of something that I would have thought impossible just a few short years ago. But if I look at his trajectory, the journey we’ve been on to get here, every challenge he’s faced or taken on, I shouldn’t be surprised. This is the boy who, at the age of five, could not say his name when a doctor asked. This is the boy who could not go into stores, movie theaters, and restaurants because his sensory issues overwhelmed him. This is the teen who needed a modified diploma because, although he understood the material, he could not handle the volume of work.

But he made it through high school, and he walked across the stage to receive that diploma while his classmates cheered. He was voted “Most Likely to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse” by his senior class. He spent time getting to know a girl and he asked her to prom and she said yes.

When he said, two weeks ago, I don’t think I’m ready for this, I told him, “You can do this, Nigel.” And with the supports in place, I know he will.

 

Image courtesy of Wikipedia

Transition Check-In: Limited Means

IMG_0031“I don’t like it when you say ‘special needs’ or ‘developmental disabilities’ about me.”

“I’m sorry, I didn’t realize that.”

“It makes me feel like I’m incapable of doing things.”

“I’ll do my best not to use that terminology with you. What do you prefer that I say instead?”

After a moment of thought: “Say that I’m a person of limited means.”

*

As I write this, I am on day two of a pretty bad migraine. The boys and I have just finished getting over illnesses and dry throats due to two and a half weeks of the central heating system in our new apartment not working properly. The fan blew recycled air out of every vent in every room 24/7 for two and a half weeks. The technician had to make three trips here before it finally shut off, which was yesterday. My computer was not connecting to the internet for almost a week, which is bad because I do a lot of work online from home, and after spending an hour and a half on the phone with Dell’s tech support in India, it crashed completely and I couldn’t even work offline. Over three more hours and two more calls-to-India later, it was fixed. Apparently this occurred during the peak of Mercury in retrograde.

So yes, the next step in Nigel’s transition to adulthood: we have moved into a 3-bedroom apartment, and everyone is pretty excited to have more space. I am happy that all of Nigel’s stuff is confined to his new bedroom. Aidan is happy not to have Nigel’s captain’s bed sitting in the middle of his room. And I’m sure Nigel is particularly happy that no one is constantly tripping over him or his things. (As an aside, I’m also glad that the light never goes out in the middle of my shower anymore.)

Incidentally, three days ago Nigel turned 19. He received a couple of checks for his birthday, and yesterday we went to the bank to deposit them. I have taken him to the bank several times before in the past three years to do this very thing. We walked over to the counter where all the deposit and withdrawal slips are, and I said, “Okay, pretend I’m not here. Just do all the things we’ve practiced before, and ask me if you have any questions.” He stood there, blank look on his face. In a defensive tone he said, “How am I supposed to remember what to do?!” I calmly reminded him that we’d done all of this many times before. “I bet you didn’t have to do this when you were 19!”

I refrained from telling him that when I was 19, I had my own apartment, a car, a checking account, a credit card, paid my own bills, and college tuition. I simply said yes, I did, and walked him through the steps for perhaps the ninth time. And so it goes.

What’s next for Nigel? As soon as I get rid of this migraine, I will be signing him up for Goodwill’s GED program, and he will focus on that for however long it takes. He’s been getting out into the community by riding his bike on an almost daily basis and remembering to text me when he leaves the house and when he returns. We’re at about a 30% rate of him remembering on his own to take his medication twice a day, despite various methods of helping him to do it on his own. But, as in most situations with a person of limited means, one thing at a time.

*

I told him, gently, that the term “limited means” usually refers to a low financial status (and other things that I know he didn’t have in mind). “Oh,” he said. I assured him that I wanted to be respectful of his preference and suggested “differently abled,” which he vetoed. Finally, in frustration he asked, “Why is it so important to you?” I didn’t have an answer for him, other than what I had already said about being respectful. And, just like that, he had made his preference known.

At the Threshold

Tomorrow, Nigel and I are going to tour a local supported living facility that is a potential home for him in seven months. Now that he’s 18 and approved for adult services, he’s eligible. How did we get to this point?

*

There is a part of me that is elated, I am sorry to admit. I have been his primary parent for 14 years, and a co-parent for four.  And I don’t have much left in me to give. I have been to every single goddamn IEP meeting for 15 years. Not just the annual ones – they happened more often than that for him. Add to that all the extra meetings and conferences with teachers, principals, therapists, and specialists. All the emails and phone calls. God help me. The phone calls – that there was a behavioral problem and I needed to leave work and pick him up. So.Many.Times. The doctor appointments. The blood tests. The changing of medications. The seizures, the horrible seizures and my resulting PTSD. The MRIs and EEGs. The picking up of prescriptions and their not being ready and my time being wasted. The forgetting to take his medication and me having to drive to his school to get it to him. The bullying. The bullshit of dealing with the teachers and school district about the bullying. Having to homeschool him because the school district suggested he be bussed to a different school district. And moving farther back, there were the years of screaming and bolting in grocery stores, restrooms, parking lots, restaurants, almost any public place. The extreme sound sensitivity. The not talking. The echolalia. The explaining/apologizing for his inappropriate behavior. The fear of the future.

But I am also elated about the prospect of him moving out because the past two years, since his epilepsy started, he has been very difficult to live with. By that I mean, as I mentioned in my last post, that he has become aggressive. He has also been verbally abusive to me. He has yelled at me and frequently says incredibly disrespectful things. I realize that a large part of that could have been due to his undiagnosed, untreated bipolar, which we are still jockeying meds to manage. But I am near the end of my proverbial rope. I am holding on – trying to – for seven more months until he graduates from high school with his modified diploma. I feel that I owe him that – staying home with me until then. He has worked as hard as he could to graduate with his peers. That’s all he ever wanted – what he said to me when he was 10 years old (and again at 12) – I just want to be like everyone else.

And it pains me to still see the differences. It pains me to think that, after everything we’ve been through, placing him in a supported living facility is the best I can do for him. He’ll still be able to take GED classes at the local community college. But I’m not elated about that. I’m also not elated that I’m having to “think of the future,” as my mother pointed out. “What would we do if something happened to you?” To be honest, unlike most special needs parents, I don’t think about that. I’m not sure if it’s because, as a long-term single parent, something has already happened to me: I’m a burned out shell of myself. I’ve had to do more than double duty for too long, and the thought of some other entity taking over soon is the only thing keeping me going. Or, the fact that I don’t worry about what would happen in my absence might also be because of a different something, something that parents of children with epilepsy try not to think about but that keeps us awake at night (check out #10 at this link). I may outlive my child.

Regardless, we are at the threshold of the future I previously feared. We are here – transition is now. In childbirth, as many of us know, transition is the period of labor that comes right before pushing. It’s the most intense part of the process and the contractions are the strongest. And the pangs I am experiencing now, before the last push in June, are incredibly strong.  I want to do right by him, because I love him fiercely, as much as I ever did, but his behavior is making me think I will not miss him! I know, it’s supposed to happen that way. Some birds need a little nudge out of the nest. But somehow this feels different. Probably because he’s such a different bird.   

*

I tried so hard to ensure the best possible future for him. Understandably, I was crushed when what I thought he needed didn’t happen. But during this time of transition, I am realizing that what I thought he needed for a successful future might have been mere wishful thinking on my part. Even before he could talk, I have always thought that Nigel would succeed on his own terms. Sometimes, I just need to remind myself of that.

image courtesy of http://www1.cgmh.org.tw